Difference between revisions of "Sino-auricular heart block as an epileptic manifestation: A case report"

From SUDEP Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search
(Created page with "''Phizackerley PJ, Poole EW, and Whitty CW (1954) Sino-auricular heart block as an epileptic manifestation: A case report. Epilepsia 3: 89–91.'' '''[http://onlinelibrary.wi...")
 
Line 3: Line 3:
 
'''[http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-1157.1954.tb03156.x/epdf Link to Article]'''
 
'''[http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1528-1157.1954.tb03156.x/epdf Link to Article]'''
  
'''Abstract:''' The clinical manifestations  of  the  so-called “temporal lobe epilepsies” are protean. There is  however  clear-cut  and  increasing  evidence that  visceral  symptoms are  an  important  and frequent  part of the  picture  (Moulder et  al., 1954). Amongst these, cardiovascular changes are  recorded  though  they  are  usually  sub- jective phenomena  such  as  palpitations,  and objective evidence of  cardiac dysrhythmias in a clearly established epileptic setting is rare.  The following  case  is thought worth  recording because episodes of  complete cardiac arrest, demonstrated  electrocardiographically as  due to siauricular  block, were  preceded by  attacks of angor animi and clouding of  consciousness, and  a focus of abnormal activity  in  the  right temporal  region was  shewn  on  electroencephalography.  We  have been unable  to  find  any detailed report of  cardiac arrest  as a  primary epileptic manifestation, though  Kinnier-Wilson (1928) amongst  others,  states  that this can occur as a  visceral  variant. The evidence for regarding the sineauricular block as part of an epileptic discharge  in this case,  was,  in  our opinion, convincing.
+
'''Abstract:''' The clinical manifestations  of  the  so-called “temporal lobe epilepsies” are protean. There is  however  clear-cut  and  increasing  evidence that  visceral  symptoms are  an  important  and frequent  part of the  picture  (Moulder et  al., 1954). Amongst these, cardiovascular changes are  recorded  though  they  are  usually  subjective phenomena  such  as  palpitations,  and objective evidence of  cardiac dysrhythmias in a clearly established epileptic setting is rare.  The following  case  is thought worth  recording because episodes of  complete cardiac arrest, demonstrated  electrocardiographically as  due to siauricular  block, were  preceded by  attacks of angor animi and clouding of  consciousness, and  a focus of abnormal activity  in  the  right temporal  region was  shewn  on  electroencephalography.  We  have been unable  to  find  any detailed report of  cardiac arrest  as a  primary epileptic manifestation, though  Kinnier-Wilson (1928) amongst  others,  states  that this can occur as a  visceral  variant. The evidence for regarding the sineauricular block as part of an epileptic discharge  in this case,  was,  in  our opinion, convincing.
  
 
=Context=
 
=Context=
  
 
=Comments=
 
=Comments=

Revision as of 08:29, 17 October 2017

Phizackerley PJ, Poole EW, and Whitty CW (1954) Sino-auricular heart block as an epileptic manifestation: A case report. Epilepsia 3: 89–91.

Link to Article

Abstract: The clinical manifestations of the so-called “temporal lobe epilepsies” are protean. There is however clear-cut and increasing evidence that visceral symptoms are an important and frequent part of the picture (Moulder et al., 1954). Amongst these, cardiovascular changes are recorded though they are usually subjective phenomena such as palpitations, and objective evidence of cardiac dysrhythmias in a clearly established epileptic setting is rare. The following case is thought worth recording because episodes of complete cardiac arrest, demonstrated electrocardiographically as due to siauricular block, were preceded by attacks of angor animi and clouding of consciousness, and a focus of abnormal activity in the right temporal region was shewn on electroencephalography. We have been unable to find any detailed report of cardiac arrest as a primary epileptic manifestation, though Kinnier-Wilson (1928) amongst others, states that this can occur as a visceral variant. The evidence for regarding the sineauricular block as part of an epileptic discharge in this case, was, in our opinion, convincing.

Context

Comments